The work of James Milton Smith is as diverse as the man behind the art.

He is bold and fearless when he paints, confident in borrowing from the present and a genius at assembling from the past tableaus that tell stories.

Smith’s work encompasses an encyclopedia of topics he has tackled. From history and nature to classic automobiles to Southwest and Wisconsin images, the work of James Milton Smith is stylish and stylized, but most of all professional. Most recognizable are Smith’s historic buildings and areas around Wisconsin, even Dodge County.

“Unveiling the Unexpected,” is the title of the work that will be exhibited at the Seippel Arts Center from April 15 through May 20.

The community is invited to an opening reception with the artist on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. All of Smith’s work is for sale, including originals and prints.

Larger than life images will greet visitors at the door and escort them through the gallery and upstairs with more than 200 pieces of Smith’s most famous and eclectic artwork.

Smith uses oils and watercolors and has meticulously paired his art with the right frame, which further accentuates individual pieces. Many of his pieces appear as if they were created more for dignitaries and the famous than for the home.

Although Smith’s hometown is Janesville. Beaver Dam has been his home for more than 20 years.

He is well known in his profession as a fine and commercial artist, on a state and national level, and has been honored through his relationships with big name commercial accounts, producing art for companies such as John Deere, Harley Davidson, and a variety of insurance companies. He has designed artwork for the Underground Railroad Milton House Museum and became the first artist in residence at the Cedarburg Cultural Center. He has designed stamps, collector tin lid scenes, a bicentennial symbol for Janesville and created numbered and signed prints for John Deere Horicon Works at their milestone 2 million celebration. He created limited edition prints for the Wisconsin Trust for Historic Preservation.

Some of his memorabilia, including miniatures and limited edition prints, will also be showcased along with Smith’s paintings at the Seippel Center.

Smith has been integral in designing exactly how his work will be presented to guests, in the Arizona, Wisconsin, bird and automobile rooms, just to name a few.

Regular hours of the Seippel Arts Center are Wednesday through Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. or by appointment. Smith has agreed to meet groups privately who request a tour with the artist during the exhibit.

This is only the third one-artist exhibit sponsored by the Beaver Dam Area Arts Association.

For more information contact 885-3635 or email bdaaa@seippelcenter.com.

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reno leoni
reno leoni

Could you have at least got his first name right in the headline???

Enslaved
Enslaved

They don't call it the "Daily Misprint" for nothing..