{{featured_button_text}}

Trina Justman Reichert

Engagement Lead

You may see the impact of what Blue Zones Project is doing in our community by the visual engagement you witness, such as our events, commercials, or like these, our articles.

Others may know about us because they dine at one of our Approved Restaurants or shop at an Approved Grocery Store and see the blue tags and check marks making the healthy choice, the easy choice. Others, still, may be familiar with the initiative because they are employed by a workplace that has made employee well-being a priority when their company became a Blue Zones Approved work site. Perhaps you have or know children who attend a school that embraces the health of our children by collaborating with Blue Zones Project.

What is sometimes less visible to the public eye is how we also work with city governments on projects they believe will help the citizens they serve. This could be way finding with signage, making bike racks available, working on developing complete streets, helping to create safer routes for our children to get to school, and more. These programs align with adopting ideas from the places in the world where people live the healthiest, the longest. Providing people areas where they can make the choice to move naturally, safely, makes that choice easier.

We encourage and support the adoption of evidence-based best practices, like the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Safe Routes to School Program. Often, our team even does the boots on the ground work of gathering the data to help a school or municipality. We also have access to industry professionals and experience that would not otherwise be available in a community our size. These examples, and many more, are resources that, because of the generosity of the Beaver Dam Community Hospital, are accessible through Blue Zones Project.

When you were school-aged, if you lived within a mile, did you walk or bike to school? Reading on the website, saferoutesinfo.org, the U.S. DOT reported that in 1969, 41% of children in grades K-8 lived within one mile of school and 89% of them walked or biked. In 2009, 31% of children in grades K-8 lived within one mile of school and 35% of them walked or biked. There are several factors that parents reported as reasons why their children didn’t walk or bicycle to school, but one of the most significant was “traffic- related danger.” That is something that can be addressed. Blue Zones Project Dodge County is proud to work alongside those who are already dedicated to making our communities safer for our children. Over the last three years, we have done several studies throughout our communities that have resulted in enhancements to safety in several neighborhoods. If you are a parent, encourage your child’s school to participate in Safe Routes to School with Blue Zones Project.

Together, we can make Dodge County a healthier, safer community in which to call home.

Blue Zones Project is a community-led well-being initiative designed to make healthy choices easier through improvements to a city’s environment, policies, and social networks. Blue Zones Project is brought to Dodge County through sponsorship by Beaver Dam Community Hospitals a member of Marshfield Clinic Health Systems, in collaboration with Sharecare, Inc. and Blue Zones, LLC. Dodge County is the first Blue Zones Project demonstration site in the state. To For more information, call 920-392-9408, email bluezonesprojectdodgecounty@sharecare.com or visit bluezonesproject.com.

Blue Zones Project is a community-led well-being initiative designed to make healthy choices easier through improvements to a city’s environment, policies, and social networks. Blue Zones Project is brought to Dodge County through sponsorship by Beaver Dam Community Hospitals a member of Marshfield Clinic Health Systems, in collaboration with Sharecare, Inc. and Blue Zones, LLC. Dodge County is the first Blue Zones Project demonstration site in the state. To For more information, call 920-392-9408, email bluezonesprojectdodgecounty@sharecare.com or visit bluezonesproject.com.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

We welcome reader interaction. What are your questions about this article? Do you have an idea to share? Please stick to the topic and maintain a respectful attitude toward other participants. (You can help: Use the 'Report' link to let us know of off-topic or offensive posts.)